What You Should Know About Blast Nozzles

When you buy a blast machine, several of its essentials come with a timely lifespan; one of these items is the blast nozzle. It is one of those parts that wears out fast and needs frequent replacements to maintain a steady functionality of the whole machine. The dictating factor on how long the blast nozzle…

When you buy a blast machine, several of its essentials come with a timely lifespan; one of these items is the blast nozzle. It is one of those parts that wears out fast and needs frequent replacements to maintain a steady functionality of the whole machine. The dictating factor on how long the blast nozzle is going to serve you is based on the material used to make it. The most common and durable makes are the tungsten carbide nozzles . The other factor is how often it's being used and the type of material used in the blasting process and the pressure.

What to consider when buying blasting nozzles.

The amount of force needed in the process, there are two types of nozzles based on their sizes and that dictates the amount of force given by each. Long nozzles are preferred where a greater amount of force is needed and the blast media needs to be pushed a long way. On the other hand, short nozzles produce less force and preferred on areas that do not require aggressive force.

The other factor to consider is the type of threads on the blast nozzles, they can either be fine or coarse and they both have merits and demerits. The more significant type being the coarse threaded nozzles as it prevails backflow of the media back to the holder that moderating the problem.

The nozzle size is another factor for consideration, the amount of media being pushed out through the nozzle depends on how accommodative the nozzle is, wider ones will automatically allow more media and vice versa. However, the compressor should be able to feed the right amount of media through the nozzle and too little will yield inconsistency and too much will lead to more tear on the nozzle end.

Regarding the design type, blast nozzles either fall under venturi or straight designs. The difference is in how they are designed to function. For example, the venturi nozzles are wide on the rear end and narrow at the tip, this means that there is pressure build up resulting into more force and less media being used. The straight nozzles lack this modification and therefore are less productive compared to their counterparts.

The casing material of the nozzle is another thing to consider, proper casing such as with a durable protective cover like rubber casing, can protect the nozzle from breakages resulting from accidental dropping.

Conclusion

The above pointer indicates on general considerations in the common available blasting nozzles. You should also consider things like the type of media you intend to use, what you want to achieve and the budget.