How and When to Use a Wedge Bolt

There are several types of anchors and fasteners and sometimes knowing which to use can be complicated. The wedge bolt is a popular option because of its versatility and strength. Bolts either have a hexagonal screw head or some type of Phillips head. They are generally known to be stronger anchors than traditional types as…

There are several types of anchors and fasteners and sometimes knowing which to use can be complicated. The wedge bolt is a popular option because of its versatility and strength. Bolts either have a hexagonal screw head or some type of Phillips head. They are generally known to be stronger anchors than traditional types as they are unaffected by vibration.

To start, a wedge is only one piece. Where many other anchors will require a washer or other piece to function properly, a bolt does all the work on its own. Wedge bolts are generally made of high strength carbon steel and are used in concrete, brick, or stone. Keeping track of and gathering the appropriate inventory for a given construction project is a very important, and stressful, piece to the project. The fact that wedge bolts work in several different compounds simplifies the job for builders and contractors as they can stock up on these and are assured they will work in a variety of different construction projects.

Wedge bolts are designed with a different type of threading than most anchors, known as relief threading. Relief threading requires less torque for the bolt to be thoroughly tightened and also helps reduce the amount of dust collected on the bolt itself. Keeping the bolt free of dust may seem like a very minor issue, but dust is one of the main reasons that fasteners get jammed. Relief threading will also allow you to install the bolts closer to the edges than normal anchors because it causes the bolt to work itself into the base material rather than forcing it to expand.

While adhesive bolts can be used in the same type of projects as wedge bolts, the wedge bolt is far easier to both install and uninstall. Adhesive anchors require a hole to be drilled, adhesive to be added, and then require a significant amount of time to properly dry and fasten while wedge bolts can be installed and completed in just a matter of minutes. Many builders and contractors do not think of it during the time of construction, but the uninstallation of anchors and fasteners should have taken into consideration during the building process. When wedge bolts are removed they leave you with an undamaged hole with little or no corrosion to the surface. Uninstallation of anchors and fasteners occurs more frequently than one may think, especially when correcting construction errors. A site like this would be a great resource if you are looking for more types of bolts.