Cutting Lubricant: Longer Lasting Tool Life

Remember that time when you used your threading tools and they just did not cut as precisely as they used to? The tap has become dull. It's no secret that adding cutting lubricants will increase tap life and tool life. With the last round of special taps perhaps you did not use as much lubricant,…

Remember that time when you used your threading tools and they just did not cut as precisely as they used to? The tap has become dull. It's no secret that adding cutting lubricants will increase tap life and tool life. With the last round of special taps perhaps you did not use as much lubricant, or any. But when you go to buy your second round of cutting tools and parts, add cutting lubricant to your list. For home workers that use their tools once in a while, in comparison to one who uses thread taps on a daily basis at work, it's easy to forget to add lubricant. I mean it's easy to say, “I rarely use them, there is no need.” They are environmentally smart and only require a little dab of lubricant to your tapping drills.

For those who use cutting lubricants, everything I said above is old news. Consider it a reminder. Special taps can be more interesting. I'm just saying that you can have fun creating taps and receiving them in a day's time is good service. An example is application-specific special taps. Tap suppliers are capable of manufacturing reliable special taps blueprinted from your specifications. Want HSSE material? Application-specific includes jut the high quality steel.

Considering something more time and money efficient? Special taps include a combined drill and tap. What does this mean? Oh, this means what it suggests: a 2-in-1. They significantly increase part throughput in production runs. I'm just going to add that it'd be wise to consider cutting lubricant on the cost cutting tap like this one. When your tools are near the end, there is a positive and negative way to look at it. I suggest positive thinking. By this I mean, buying new taps is an opportunity to take the time to figure what is the most efficient choice, especially if you feel you are not getting your money's worth. Obviously, you will, or should, want a reliable supplier you can depend on when you're in need of new taps; a provider that is going to be around for a while and knows their stuff. Let's say you need a carbide tap in addition to a carbide tap. Can you get them both in one stop? I would hope so. Gas is too expensive to be driving around town for parts. On the other hand, yes, there is always shipping, which I guess most cutting and threading tool orders are easier completed online.