Buying, Using and Storing a Snowthrower

Buying a snowthrower is not a difficult task, at least it is not supposed to be. In addition to buying this useful tool, though, you will also need to use it and store it somewhere. Think of the snow fall that you usually get, the size of your driveway and sidewalk and the areas that…

Buying a snowthrower is not a difficult task, at least it is not supposed to be. In addition to buying this useful tool, though, you will also need to use it and store it somewhere. Think of the snow fall that you usually get, the size of your driveway and sidewalk and the areas that you would not be able to use a snow thrower and then decide if you still think that you need to buy one. That is step one.

Step One: Buying Your Snow Thrower or Blower

First, while they both do similar things, there is an obvious difference between throwers and blowers- the throwers throw the snow to either side of the machine as the user pushes it forward. The blowers lift the snow up and blow it from a discharge chute. The average drawer can throw snow as far as 40 feet away, which might be another consideration when you are deciding whether to buy one or not. If you are tossing your snow onto your neighbor's driveway, it will not make community relations all that great.

Choose a model that you can handle, physically. If you have a motor that is too powerful, you might find that you do not need effort to push it forward but you may also find that you can not control the blower's path or direction. If you only get a few inches of snow, a few days of the year on average, even a wicked and completely out of the blue snowstorm will not warrant buying any type of machine. Only buy one if you will actually need and use it.

Step Two: Using the Machine You Have Bought

If you are buying one of these machines, you need to understand how they work. Some are powered by gas and oil motors but may have electric starters that make them easier to start up. Some are totally electric meaning that they do not need gas and cause no emissions at all. They do require electricity, which may increase your cost per month. Before you use it for the first time, it is imperative that you read the instruction and safety manual and keep all precautions and warnings in mind.

Do not attempt to modify or change your snow blower in any way or you will void your warranty and increase your risk of harm as well. Be aware of any type of obstructions, dips or other structures that you might be passing over and keep in mind that you may come in contact with rocks or gravel while you are clearing your driveway or sidewalk.

Step Three: Storage

At the end of the season, you should follow the instructions that are included. You should wipe down any moisture from the blades as well as removing any debris that might be done in the machine. In some machines, the suggestion is to drain the gas from the tank before storing the snowthrower for the spring and summer months.